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Staying in hospital with Daisy at 18 months old

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Recently our lovely daughter Daisy had to spend some time in hospital. When we arrived in A&E initially we thought that she may be suffering because of her FPIES.

It later turned out that she had a problem with her stomach X-Ray and we had to stay in hospital while she was rehydrated and to ensure that she got better.

This was obviously a bit of an upsetting time but I want to share our experience in the hope that it may help someone else in the future if they find themselves in the same position.

When we first arrived at A&E we were told, within an hour, that Daisy was going to be staying in hospital.

I was upset about this, as it meant that she definitely was poorly and something had flagged up in her bloods or on her X-ray. However, it later turned out she wasn’t seriously ill, which was such a relief!

Daisy Staying in hospital

While in hospital it was all quite routine. Daisy had blood tests, a cannula fitted for a rehydration drip and she was kept off food for the first night. No milk and no solid food.

This was lucky as it turned out that they didn’t have any suitable food available for Daisy… NONE.

She was offered an allergy meal on her second day in hospital but it turned up with chicken in. Which is one of Daisy’s allergies. Fortunately my Mum lives close by and was able to arrange food for Daisy.

When it came to staying in hospital I was really fortunate that Thomas wanted to stay, and was relatively happy to do so. As I had already had several bad nights with Daisy at home before we got to this point I was relieved to be able to go home and get some sleep.

Although, when I got there I couldn’t sleep for worry about what was to come.

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What will you need for staying in hospital with a baby?

Typically you will need to pack everything you would usually pack in your nappy bag, as well as additional formula (if not breastfeeding or fully weaned), any regular medications, clothing and food if your child has allergies like mine does.

You will also need supplies for yourself if you’re able to stay overnight, which you usually are. Most children’s wards will have a camp bed for parents to stay overnight with their children. And this is expected.

Overall for us as a family staying in hospital wasn’t as bad as expected. Thomas managed to get a fairly decent sleep while in the ward with Daisy and we were able to go home after a couple of days.

Daisy was rehydrated and while in the ward she was able to see her allergist which meant that she could get a new medication for her coughing – one that has actually been helping.

Your child staying in hospital is never a nice experience but for us it was a necessary one. Daisy was dehydrated, and had a blockage in her stomach.

By the time we left she was almost back to normal and feeling much better. She has been vomiting on and off for the past couple of weeks but the new medicine that she was prescribed, for her coughing, has been really helpful and we are hoping it will be added to her repeat prescription now.

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This is Daisy just before we were able to leave hospital:

Staying in hospital

Daisy got herself in this car, which was FULL of water, and refused to get out, even though she was shivering and soaked through. I knew at this point she was feeling better, and back to her usual stubborn self!! 

Staying in hospital was a necessary evil for us, to get Daisy back on track, and I appreciate being able to be at home even more now!

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